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Car accident crush injuries can threaten your limbs and your life

Crush injuries can occur in a number of different situations. Although many occur in work-related accidents, they can also arise in motor vehicle accidents. For example, if your car rolls over in a crash, it could trap and crush one or more areas of the body, causing catastrophic damage.

By itself, a crush injury is devastating as it could lead to dangerous bleeding, nerve damage and muscle destruction. However, what happens or does not happen in the aftermath of the trauma can complicate a crush injury.

What complications are possible after the initial harm?

If emergency medical personnel reach you quickly after crash-related crush trauma, you have a chance of avoiding additional injury. If you do not receive immediate treatment, you risk suffering life-threatening complications.

Limb ischemia. If blood flow to the injured limb drops or becomes restricted, limb ischemia could occur, possibly leading to an amputation. When left untreated for too long, cardiovascular complications or death is also a risk.

Acute compartment syndrome. If the pressure in the crushed body part builds to a dangerous level and cuts off blood flow, it is called compartment syndrome. Prolonged crushing with reduced blood flow usually requires emergency surgery and other treatments for recovery.

Crush syndrome (rhabdomyolysis). When crush injuries severely damage skeletal muscle tissue, it can cause the breakdown of cellular integrity. In response, the body releases harmful toxins and protein into the bloodstream. Without swift medical intervention, crush syndrome can result in internal organ damage or death.

Severe injuries like those discussed here usually require ongoing medical treatment to make a full or partial recovery. Most people cannot afford such extensive health care. Learning more about New Jersey laws governing injury and accident compensation can ensure you get the financial compensation you deserve.